Alcoholics Anonymous AA support-groups

The Start Of Alcoholics Anonymous


The community of Alcoholics Anonymous has been providing great support and healing for recovering alcoholics for nearly 80 years. Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith both of whom were alcoholics, aiming to encourage others to quit and remain sober. There are 12 traditions that were put in place to help define the reason for the group's existence but first, the famous 12 steps were introduced to help give the meetings some direction. The 12 Steps are still followed, and many recovered alcoholics say belonging to an AA group saw them through the recovery journey.


Presently, Alcoholics Anonymous can boast of more than 2 million active members throughout the world and more than 50,000 groups nationwide.


What To Expect From Attending An AA Meeting

It is always quite challenging the first time you go for the meeting if you are not aware of what goes on there. The idea of going to a room full of people you don't know you are going through a problem and are seeking help can be intimidating. This feeling is felt by most of the people you'll encounter in the meetings. The original model is still in use today and it helps that the organisation was started by recovering alcoholics who understood the challenge. Sharing a common experience of being alcoholics is what makes AA successful in its objective and mission.


You can always expect a warm welcome when you attend the sessions. They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. AA realises that there are people who feel uncomfortable when sharing info about private matters during their first visit. During the meetings, the people present will openly discuss various issues about their lives and this helps many of them to find peace.


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Closed Vs Open Gatherings

Only the people that are struggling with alcohol addiction are the ones allowed to attend the closed meetings in AA.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. Going to either an open or a closed meeting depends only on what one you are comfortable with. This is mainly because some people do not want to involve their families and friends in their struggle with alcoholism and the recovery process. There those who need family and friends to be there when they attend the meetings.


The Twelve Steps For AA

The 12 steps were first started in Alcoholics Anonymous but is used in addiction recovery groups for many other drugs nowadays. It involves following one stage t the next throughout the whole recovery process. A patient may repeat a particular step until they are certified with the results.

Accepting the fact that you are suffering from alcoholism is usually the first stage you go through. Subsequently, the steps include making decisions to quit, accepting yourselves and others the wrongs which may have been committed, making amends for the wrongdoings along with making a commitment to improve continually. You can read more about the 12 steps here.


Reasons For Not Going To AA Meetings

Since attending AA meetings may bring discomfort, so many people will find reasons not to attend such meetings. Some of their common objections are the following

  • They are not convinced the meetings can help them
  • They are afraid of confronting someone they know
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

It is important at this stage to focus on the fact that you have genuine reasons for having considered going to the meetings in the first place even if the other reasons are weighing heavily on you.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. You will definitely overcome your addiction to alcohol when you commit yourself to attending these AA meetings without missing.


Finding An Alcoholics Anonymous Group Near You

There is always an AA group not too far from where you are. There is usually a schedule of meetings for each group; it is best to join as soon as you can. We can help you identify the AA meetings near your location and you can choose the type of meeting you want to attend. Please contact 0800 246 1509 today so we can help you find a reliable AA group to help you today.